The Hitchhikers Guideto the Galaxy(Boxed Set) and
The Ultimate Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy–The Complete Trilogy in Five Parts by Douglas Adams
Release Date: Late Nov
2020, being what it is, you would be forgiven for not realising that The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams had its 42nd anniversary earlier this year. Nevertheless, publishers did remember and we will be receiving redesigned anniversary editions of the individual books in a boxed set as well as a soft cover omnibus edition – The Complete Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy – the trilogy so good it took five books to do it justice.

Rhythm of War by Brandon Sanderson
Release Date: Mid Nov
This is the fourth novel in the Stormlight Archive series, which is itself one of multiple series’ set within Brandon Sanderson’s Cosmere universe. It’s all very complicated and it would take far too long to bring you up to speed, though I do highly recommend reading them. What readers should know is that we will be getting the local version of the hardback, the local version of the trade paperback and a limited number of the US hardcovers. So if you would like one of the US editions, then you’ll need to contact us pronto, because numbers will be strictly limited on them.

War Girls by Tochi Onyebushi
Release Date: Mid Nov
A young adult science fiction novel set in a future Nigeria, wracked with a high technology war and conflict, and following two sisters separated by the upheavals and desperate to find each other and find freedom. While set in a science fiction future, the issues of child soldiers, civil war and social upheaval in Africa are current, and this book offers a way to explore them away from the  24 hour news cycle.

Mysteries of the Quantum Universe by Thibault Damour & Mathieu Burniat
Release Date: Mid Nov
This is the paperback version of a very popular hard cover of a few years ago. It’s a graphic novel where epic traveller Bob and his dog Rick set out to explore the science behind quantum mechanics and physics through interviews, visuals and visits with famous physicists throughout history. This is serious science with the accessibility of a comic book.

In the Black by Patrick M Tomlinson
Release Date: Mid Nov
Something for those who like military-esque space opera that’s not too heavy, this one has been tagged The Hunt For Red October in space. Spy satellites are going dark at the edge of the demilitarised zone and Captain Kamala and her crew are sent to investigate. With the arrival of a very advanced and somewhat aggressive alien ship things get complicated. Diplomacy and various corporate and government agendas collide in this fun standalone book.

Troy: Our Greatest Story Retold by Stephen Fry
Release Date: Early Nov
Stephen Fry returns to the classical world for his third exploration of ancient history and myth. This time to the legends around Troy, deconstructing Homer and history text and giving readers an insight into not just what the story of Troy was, but what it meant to the people who told it and listened to it as well as what that tells us about them. Fascinating read by somebody who has proven to be remarkably good at this sort of thing.

There is a Graveyard That Dwells in Man by David Tibet
Release Date: Mid Nov
Generally I try to sell folks a mixed author anthology by telling you about the cool writers you know who are in it. This one is the opposite. Complied by writer, poet and musician David Tibet, this is a collection of the strange and macabre selected for its relative obscurity. Ancient and modern sit side by side here, and each bizarre experience has its own potted history and commentary. A delight for those who enjoy the unnerving and peculiar.

Ready Player Two by Ernest Cline
Release Date: Late Nov
Ready Player One was a bestselling novel and very successful movie. Folks have been asking for a sequel, and here it is. To avoid spoilers, however, I won’t tell you much about it except that Wade Watts finds something very interesting in Halliday’s vaults, something that could change the Oasis for the better, or for the worse. He also acquires a new nemesis out to do terrible things, to the Oasis and to him. Great fun adventure, with lots and lots of nostalgia and pop-culture spot-o.

The Tower of Fools by Andrzej Sapkowski
Release Date: Early Nov
This new book, by the author of The Witcher, is not in fact fantasy. It’s historical fiction set in Poland and around the Hussite wars of the 1400s, a conflict between Catholics and Hussite Christians in Bohemia and eastern Europe. Historical fiction or not, it’s got all the great characters and intensity you’d get from a Sapkowksi fantasy, just without the magic. Trust me, there’s enough going on here that you won’t miss it. Translation is by David French, who also translated The Witcher novels.

Hollow Places: An Unusual History of Land and Legend by Christopher Hadley
Release Date: Early Nov
In Herefordshire there was a legend about a giant and a dragon, all centred on a particular ancient tree. When the tree was cut down in the 1800s, a massive hollow was found underneath it. Really the home of a dragon, or something else? In this book, Christopher Hadley explores all of the traditions and stories surrounding this particular myth and legend and all of the bits of history that circumstantially support, it. Perhaps.

The Midnight Circus by Jane Yolen
Release Date: Mid Oct
Store regulars will probably recognise Jane Yolen for her reinterpretations of folktales, often referred to as fractured fairytales, whereby she re-imagines the classics with twists and different perceptions of character. This new book, however, is a collection of her creepy stories, showing that she has more than one string to her bow, and based on my enjoyment of her fairytale collections, I think these should be some very interesting and very disturbing stories indeed.

Death in Daylesford by Kerry Greenwood
Release Date: Early Nov
It’s been 7 years since we have had a Phryne Fisher mystery, but this month, that oversight gets corrected in the form of Death in Daylesford. It begins with a mysterious invitation to Miss Fisher to visit a retreat for shell-shocked WWI soldiers. Over time things happen, people die and mysteries need to get solved. This is classic period detective fiction by one of Australia’s most popular sleuth authors and I’m sure fans will be dying to get on to it.

You Goddess by Elizabeth Foley
Release Date: Early Nov
Part reference work and part social commentary, this book features 25 goddesses from world mythology and folklore, illustrating their place in culture and also the ways in which attitudes towards women can affect even the way goddesses are depicted. It’s a very insightful and interesting book and well worth a read for anybody who is interested in history and folklore and would like to learn about some new goddesses to perhaps be inspired by. We also have Elizabeth Foley’s earlier book, What Would Boudica Do, which is a similarly inspirational book about famous women in history and how they dealt with particular problems. Some of them, like Boudica, rather bloodily.

The Betrayals by Bridget Collins
Release Date: Mid Nov
Bridget Collins‘ 2018 book The Binding was a cross-genre hit and I’ve had a lot of enquiries as to when she’ll have a new book out. Well, now. As with The Binding, it’s about inner lives, lies and the way the past impacts the future. I’d say it’s got the same light touch when it comes to magic that renders the world slightly unreal. A mysterious academy dedicated to the equally mysterious grand jeu is the final refuge for one of its disgraced alumni. Troubled by the fact that a women now holds the academy’s highest office (unthinkable is his day) he is nevertheless drawn to her. As the academy approaches the most important day of its year the truth about the pasts of both of them will be revealed. Stylish and atmospheric, this is a slow-burn but worth the wait. And yes, it’s as good as The Binding.

The Princess and the Prick by Walburga Appleseed
Release Date: Early Nov
A not entirely tongue-in-cheek retelling of some classic childhood tales through a feminist lens. Evil step mothers, ugly step sisters and princesses always in need of rescuing. If you think about it Sleeping Beauty has serious consent problems and Cinderella has bought into all sorts of damaging class and beauty myths. It’s a mix of prose and pithy poetry that drags the likely lads of fairytale into the 21st century for a frankly overdue re-examination. Insightful and funny.

Space Is Cool As Fuck by Kate Howells
Release Date: Early Nov
I suppose there is no reason why a non-fiction book about the mysteries and wonders of space and science should necessarily be couched in terms that we would consider polite. In fact, as Kate Howells demonstrates, using a sprinkling of profanity to demonstrate just how impressed she is by so much that is going on in the universe makes it far more relatable and infinitely more fun. This is seriously one for science buffs, particularly if you want a laugh as well as a lot of very clever information with an unorthodox enthusiastic vocabulary.

The Ikessar Falcon by K S Villoso
Release Date: Late Nov
This is the second in the Chronicles of the Bitch Queen series, which should give you a good idea of what to expect. Rejected by her people Queen Talyien is nevertheless determined to save her homeland. But it’s a long road, and long the way she’ll have to deal with plots, betrayal, mad dragons, shadow creatures and worst of all, men who will do anything for power. If you’ve been looking for a new grimdark series with a gritty, no-nonsense woman protagonist then this is for you.

An Unnatural Life by Erin K Wagner
Release Date: Mid Nov
Science fiction fans have no doubt seen robots achieve intelligence, robots fall in love and robots fight to be accepted just the same as humans, however what happens when the first robot is charged with murder just like a fellow human would be. This is the premise of Erin K Wagner’s new book and a very interesting take on where the idea of intelligent machines with the same status as people invariably takes us in terms of the law, prejudice and justice.

The Thief on the Winged Horse by Kate Mascarenhas
Release Date: Mid Nov
Quirky new book from the author of The Psychology of Time Travel. The Kendrick family have made dolls for generations, dolls each imbued with magic. Though founded by sisters, the men of the family have long controlled and excluded the women from learning the secrets of their forbears.   A mysterious stranger and a precious object impossibly stolen are the catalysts for Persephone Kendrick to defy tradition and reclaim the magic of her blood. Magical realism with a touch of romance. One for fans of Bridget Collins & Naomi Novik.

Nophek Gloss by Essa Hansen
Release Date: Late Nov
There’s been a lot of debut space opera books by women recently and I’ve really enjoyed all the ones I’ve read. This is one I didn’t get a preview of, but it sounded cool enough to get on my radar, so I thought I’d put it on yours as well. Caiden is the only survivor of the destruction of his homeworld, rescued by a mysterious, possibly alive ship and the strange assortment of aliens that are its crew. Caiden only wants revenge for his people, but the universe is much more complex than that as he will painfully discover. Epic space battles, sentient space ships, galaxy spanning baddies and a bunch of aliens? Definitely sounds worth a look to me.